Start Compare and contrast relative and radiometric dating

Compare and contrast relative and radiometric dating

It is possible to measure the ratio of the different radioactive parent isotopes and their daughter isotopes in a rock, but the ratios are not dates or ages.

You can use the hourglass to tell time if you know several things: the amount of sand in the top of the hourglass when it started flowing, the rate that the sand flows through the hole in the middle, and that the quantity of sand in each chamber has not been tampered with.

Far from being data, these dates are actually interpretations of the data.

As discussed before, the assumptions influence the interpretation of the data.

There is also a difference in the timescale used to explain the layers.

Determining the relative age of a rock layer is based on the assumption that you know the ages of the rocks surrounding it.

Some of the common isotope pairs used are K-Ar, Rb-Sr, Pb-Pb, and U-Pb.

Carbon-14 dating is another common technique, but it can only be used on carbon-containing things that were once alive.

The Bible gives us a much more reliable history of the earth as it was recorded by God.