Start Parenting dating teen

Parenting dating teen

It takes far more maturity than most 12- to 16-year-olds have to see that words and actions need to match.

However, even with these guidelines, three out of four of our teens had their first real date to the school prom in their junior year at age 17.

And those first dates were all with friends, not with someone with whom they were romantically involved.

It’s not that our teens were not interested in dates beyond a friendship, but we had talked through the few pros and the many cons of exclusive dating enough that they felt changing the relationship from friendship to romance might ruin the friendship.

Our teenagers would all say that their prom dates were a lot of fun. Many of the parents were involved with before-dance dinners, chaperoning the dance, and hosting after-dance activities at homes or rented facilities.

It is easy to see why there is a movement of parents to replace traditional dating with a formal courtship between a young man and woman.

These parents are involved in their children’s lives, seeking to protect their innocence and purity for marriage.

In junior high, teens don’t have the discernment to know if a friend really is a Christian.

They believe that if the child says he is a Christian, then he is.

Also, parents need to evaluate the vitality of the Christian walk of the person who may date one of their children.

Specifically, is this young man or young woman a Christian?

They need to be very choosy about whom they spend time with in light of that definition.